Super Powers - (Wise Choices for Special Needs)

Help comes in all forms

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When my son, whom has autism, was about eight, he got locked in the car. (It was only 60 degrees out, so let me clarify that right now!) He understood to push the button, but he kept pushing the lock button. In the end, the police department came and freed my little man. I had to come up with a plan...and many more to prevent situations like this from happening again. This fun two-hour workshop is for caregivers and kids alike to learn simple tips and tricks that will prevent frustration and also keep your child safe.  Children, with special needs (super powers, kids and adults alike), grow into adults and the more we can teach them and protect them the happier and healthier they will be and you, as the caregiver will be at peace knowing you are giving them the skills they need to thrive in the world. We are realistic and understand that not all children will live independently, but we do believe all children have the ability to communicate whether through words or actions. It is up to us to listen to what they have to say. 

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Doctors and Dentists Ahh

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What's the one thing our kiddos with super powers have more of than any other child????? Yup, you guessed it, doctors, dentist and therapy appointments. Now, for the most part the therapy appointments the kids enjoy. Most good therapists are well versed at building a rapport with your child, incorporating play into the therapy and making their time with the therapist enjoyable. The doctor and dentist are not always as much fun. I have been lucky with both doctors and dentists, well, that is until I recently took my son to the doctor for an infection on his leg, he spotted the sharps container on the wall and ran screaming out of the building. So once again, I have had to get creative and it has worked. Notice the picture above. Most children don't like the dentist. Do you see what this amazing dentist did in order to keep my son distracted so she could work? I'm not going to tell you. This two-hour workshop will send you home with an arsenal of information that will make visits that your child finds unpleasant or downright unbearable, manageable and even enjoyable. The workshop is for caregivers and super heroes alike and while we will give you our arsenal, we want to hear experiences that you have had in order to find ways to improve our program! 

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Friends Unexpected

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Children are like sponges. They not only absorb everything they see and hear, but they want to learn as much as they can. While stopping at a gas station last summer the band students from a local middle school were doing a car wash. My son didn't attend their school. My son wasn't friends with any of these kids. My son is low verbal. That doesn't mean he can't communicate...trust me...he gets his point across, but my point is, he was not a member of their social circle. He saw these kids washing cars so he figured, hey, I should wash Mom's car! Grabbing one of their buckets and a sponge he went to work. I stood back and observed. I wanted to see how this would play out. A couple of the chaperones spotted me and came over and introduced themselves and began observing as well. In under five minutes one boy came over and said, "need a hand buddy?" He picked up a sponge and started working on my car. Then about three more kids came over, until the entire group of twelve children were over there washing my car with my son. They were trying to talk to him but he didn't respond, but they WERE communicating with him. One of the boys said, "we missed this spot." And pointed to a section of my car and my son immediately went over and cleaned it off with the sponge.

 

Our peer group socials are fun, user friendly events that cultivate lifelong relationships for all involved. Teens that participate as peers find it to be one of the most rewarding experiences of their lives. 

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